2011 Con rit
 
orig. Con rit

An unrecognised giant sea creature has beached in Vietnam’s Ha Long Bay. A local newspaper reports that the creature looks just like the mythical sea serpent or sea dragon, known in Vietnam as Con Rit. Before a single expert has had the chance to study the serpent, it is swept into the sea by a new typhoon.

When sea biologist Martti Ritola hears about the discovery in Vietnam, he wastes no time. It may be a prehistoric animal, a scientific sensation that has so far remained hidden in the depths of the sea. Ritola must travel to Vietnam to study the serpent at any cost. The funding for his expedition comes from an ex-girlfriend, Camilla Norrstrand. Camilla’s money is tied up in a company which deforests Indonesia’s rainforests, but Ritola has no time to contemplate the ethics of it.

In Vietnam Ritola and Camilla set out to sea and enthusiastically dive in waters that are populated by exotic fish and fierce looking sharks. There is no sign of the serpent. A typhoon of record breaking magnitude is brewing on the horizon. Would they have enough time to investigate some interesting looking limestone caves?

Con rit is a thriller, a genuine cliff-hanger, and an old-fashioned adventure story. However, it also raises a serious question about whether the ancient myths related to giant sea serpents or sea dragons could actually have something to do with the reality. Con rit presents an astonishing spectrum of genuine quotes related to sea serpents, from ancient Asian legislation and Chinese chronicles to eye-witness' reports published in Asian, North American and European newspapers during the 19th century. Ancient European and North American rock carvings, Aztec and Maya sculptures, Egyptian hieroglyphs and old Asian art have all described huge, feather-headed, snake-like creatures living in the ocean, long before these continents were in touch with each other. The main Aztec God was Quetzalcoatl and the main Maya God was Kukulkan. Both were feather-headed sea serpents. In ancient China every major river had a similar, serpent-like God. In India and Indonesia the sea serpent god was called Naga and in Burma it was known as Nyan.

Are all these similarities merely coincidences, or are they based on a real sea creature that once swam in the oceans? If that animal existed, is it now extinct? Or does it still live in the depths of the ocean?

Con rit presents an astonishing spectrum of genuine quotes related to sea serpents, from ancient Asian legislation and Chinese chronicles to eye-witness' reports published in Asian, North American and European newspapers during the 19th century. 

Ancient European and North American rock carvings, Aztec and Maya sculptures, Egyptian hieroglyphs and old Asian art have all described huge, feather-headed, snake-like creatures living in the ocean, long before these continents were in touch with each other.  The main Aztec God was Quetzalcoatl and the main Maya God was Kukulkan. Both were feather-headed sea serpents. In ancient China every major river had a similar, serpent-like God. In India and Indonesia the sea serpent god was called Naga and in Burma it was known as Nyan. Are all these similarities merely coincidences, or are they based on a real sea creature that once swam in the oceans? If that animal existed, is it now extinct? Or does it still live in the depths of the ocean?

Reviews:

“... the reader’s attention is simultaneously focused on what is at the bottom of the sea, and on the world’s environmental problems. In these contexts, Con rit is every bit as frighteningly topical as Isomäki’s hit novel The Sands of Sarasvati.” Turun Sanomat

“Science author Risto Isomäki is actually an incurable romantic. However serious the environmental catastrophe in his book, the heroes always come out intact and there is hope amidst all the misery. Even though Isomäki preaches to us about how man is destroying the globe, he also believes that man can change his ways and thereby, change the world.” Warkauden lehti

“First of all I must compliment Isomäki on his advanced skill and technique as a thriller writer. He moves shrewdly between reality and legend and in doing so, he keeps the reader firmly in his grasp. The thing that keeps the reader captivated is the genre itself, the eco-thriller. The thriller industry has for a long time toiled with the most impossible of subjects, such as the President of the United States saving the globe from an attack from outer space. Isomäki has realised that themes involving political intrigue and human monsters are well and truly exhausted, meaning that the only remaining serious danger left is the revenge of ravaged nature.” Helsingin Sanomat



Utländska förlag:
Finland, Tammi/Bonnier
Latvia, Dienas Gramata